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Digital Humanities

A Wenzhou-Kean University 2018 Student Partnering with Staff (SpS) Research Program Project, A Pathway to Digital Humanities, seeks both to gauge and stimulate interest in digital humanities.

What are Cultural Analytics, Aggregation, and Data-Mining?

The field of cultural analytics has emerged over the past few years, utilizing the tools of high-end computational analysis and data visualization to dissect large scale cultural data sets.

Aggregation of large-scale amounts of information allows data or files to be merged and then outputted into displays that highlight distinctive features such as data points,clusters, and trends.

Data-mining is a term that covers a host of techniques for analyzing digital material by “parameterizing” some feature of information and extracting it.

SOURCE: Burdick, A., Drucker, J., Lunenfeld, P., Pressner, T., & Schnapp, J. (2012). Digital Humanities. Cambridge, MA: Massachuetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/digitalhumanities

Videos on Humanities Data Visualization

Books on Cultural Analytics & Humanities Data Visualization

Paradata and Transparency in Virtual Heritage

By demonstrating scholarly excellence and best technical practice in this area, this volume is concerned with the challenge of providing intellectual transparency and accountability in visualization-based historical research. Addressing a range of cognitive and technological challenges, the authors make a strong case for a wider recognition of three-dimensional visualization as a constructive, intellectual process and valid methodology for historical research and its communication.

Digital Humanities Pedagogy

Academic institutions are starting to recognize the growing public interest in digital humanities research, and there is an increasing demand from students for formal training in its methods. Despite the pressure on practitioners to develop innovative courses, scholarship in this area has tended to focus on research methods, theories and results rather than critical pedagogy and the actual practice of teaching. The essays in this collection offer a timely intervention in digital humanities scholarship, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of humanities disciplines across the world. The first section offers views on the practical realities of teaching digital humanities at undergraduate and graduate levels, presenting case studies and snapshots of the authors' experiences alongside models for future courses and reflections on pedagogical successes and failures. The next section proposes strategies for teaching foundational digital humanities methods across a variety of scholarly disciplines, and the book concludes with wider debates about the place of digital humanities in the academy, from the field's cultural assumptions and social obligations to its political visions. Digital Humanities Pedagogy broadens the ways in which both scholars and practitioners can think about this emerging discipline, ensuring its ongoing development, vitality and long-term sustainability.

Information Visualization

This book explores the art and science of why we see objects the way we do. Based on the science of perception and vision, the author presents the key principles at work for a wide range of applications - resulting in visualization of improved clarity, utility, and persuasiveness. This is the first work to use the science of perception to help serious designers and analysts optimize understanding and perception of their data visualizations.

Progress and Values in the Humanities

Using the metaphor of magnification, Gay shows that, while we can investigate natural objects to the limits of imaging capacity, magnifying cultural objects dissolves them into noise. In other words, cultural objects can be studied only within their contexts and through the prism of metaphor and narrative. Gathering examples from literature, art, film, philosophy, religion, science, and psychoanalysis, Gay builds a new justification for the humanities. By revealing the unseen and making abstract ideas tangible, the arts create meaningful wholes, which itself is a form of progress.